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How to perform the culinary technique of spherification at home

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
A hallmark of top-tier modernist cuisine, spherification is nevertheless something you can try in your own kitchen. It's time to conquer your spheres, says Sam Wong

Last Exit Space review: An unusual take on the race to colonise space

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
Rudolph Herzog’s documentary swerves the usual space experts to give an unexpected view of humanity’s efforts to live among the stars, says Simon Ings

Rabbits face a fresh onslaught akin to myxomatosis – can they survive?

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
After bouncing back from one viral threat, rabbits are being sucker-punched by a second killer disease – and these unsung eco-warriors need our help

Don't miss: The chance to get life lessons from plants and fungi

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
New Scientist's weekly round-up of the best books, films, TV series, games and more that you shouldn't miss

Beautiful new photos of flamingos thriving in Mexico's wetlands

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
Flamingos prefer their habitats "just so", and the Yucatán peninsula in Mexico ticks all the boxes, as revealed by Claudio Contreras Koob's delightful photographs

Get Rich or Lie Trying review: A pacy scroll through influencer life

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
Living for likes and subscribers can be a poisoned chalice or a dream come true, according to Get Rich or Lie Trying by journalist Symeon Brown

We mustn’t let the billionaire rocket men decide what happens in space

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
Right now, very few of us have a say in how humans get to space or what we do there. That has to change, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Artificial touch: The new tech making virtual reality more immersive

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
The feelings of touch and temperature are complex biological processes. Now everyday chemicals like menthol and capsaicin are being used to simulate them – and create more realistic VR experiences

Radioactive gummy bears, renewable trams and moon geese

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
An abridged collection of weird things Feedback learned at New Scientist Live, plus an odorous new unit for clean energy and astonishing invertebrate anuses

Learning to live with covid-19 means covering up coughs and sneezes

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
As covid-19 restrictions end in many countries, we have a moral duty to cover our mouths and nose when we sneeze and avoid socialising when we feel ill, says Jonathan R Goodman

Downfall: The case against Boeing review: Tragedy and broken trust

Me, 16/03/2022 - 20:00
Netflix's new film about recent Boeing plane crashes is a damning account of why the disasters happened and who was responsible

Sensors inspired by dandelion seeds can record signs of climate change

Me, 16/03/2022 - 18:00
Tiny sensors that can drift in the breeze like dandelion seeds can help record environmental signals across a wide area

Brain scanning studies are usually too small to find reliable results

Me, 16/03/2022 - 18:00
Most studies that have used MRI machines to find links between the brain’s structure or function and complex mental traits had an average of 23 participants, but thousands are needed to find reliable results

How a new kind of gravitational wave will reveal the early universe

Me, 16/03/2022 - 16:35
With 90 detections now under our belt, gravitational waves are solving riddles about the evolution of galaxies and missing black holes – and they could soon give us a glimpse of dark matter

What gravitational waves have told us about the universe so far

Me, 16/03/2022 - 16:35
With 90 detections now under our belt, gravitational waves are solving riddles about the evolution of galaxies and missing black holes – and they could soon give us a glimpse of dark matter

Australia’s Japanese encephalitis outbreak blamed on climate change

Me, 16/03/2022 - 16:00
Australia's record-breaking rainfall and flooding has provided an ideal breeding ground for Culex mosquitoes, which transmit the Japanese encephalitis virus

Family tree of extinct apes reveals our early evolutionary history

Me, 16/03/2022 - 16:00
A new family tree of apes that lived in the Miocene between 23 and 5.3 million years ago reveals which are our close relatives and which are only distant cousins