Riviste scientifiche

[Perspectives] Pandemic science and politics

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
In 2019, the Global Health Security Alliance assessed worldwide adherence to the International Health Regulations (2005), which supposedly commit nations to measures that prevent or control the spread of infectious diseases and mitigate their effects. The study found that no nation was fully prepared, and many countries—rich or poor—fell woefully short. This finding is only one of the many indications that we could have been ready, nationally and globally, to deal with a crisis like COVID-19, but were not.

[Perspectives] Kesaveloo Goonaruthnum Naidoo: anti-apartheid campaigner

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
Few have done as much to forge an individual identity as “Dr Goonam”, the name Kesaveloo Goonaruthnum Naidoo (1906–98) adopted as the first woman of colour to practise medicine in South Africa during the 1930s. She demanded women's inclusion in political organisations representing her Indian community, and joined others in passionate opposition to the apartheid policies that oppressed them.

[Obituary] Kirk R Smith

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
Pioneering scientist focused on health, climate, and environmental impacts of air pollution. Born in Berkeley, CA, USA, on Jan 19, 1947, he died at his home in Berkeley of a cardiac arrest following a stroke on June 15, 2020, aged 73 years.

[Correspondence] Dupilumab for nasal polyposis

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
The encouraging results of the LIBERTY trials1 evaluating the effects of dupilumab in patients with severe chronic sinusitis with nasal polyposis that use mometasone furoate nasal spray offer much-needed hope to patients with this condition. However, we believe that these results might not reflect real-life best clinical practice.

[Correspondence] Dupilumab for nasal polyposis – Authors' reply

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
We appreciate the interest shown by Brian Lipworth and colleagues in our Article1 and would like to take this opportunity to address their comments.

[Correspondence] Women's reproductive rights

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
The Correspondence by Ciaran Clarke1 is a sophisticated attempt to support forced motherhood, but, in reality, it is a vicious antiwomen statement.

[Correspondence] Women's reproductive rights

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
I hope it is stating the obvious to suggest that it is despicable both to ban abortion and to impose it on women whether in the name of religion, in the service of a political ideology, or as a perceived demographic imperative.1 Forced birth and forced abortion are foul. They are an assault on the autonomy, dignity, and rights of women, and are a threat to their lives, health, and wellbeing. Examples of banning and forcing abortions are found throughout the world and across time (sometimes in the same place and at the same time, as seen in Nazi Germany).

[Correspondence] An AI-ECG algorithm for atrial fibrillation risk: steps towards clinical implementation

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
We read with interest the Article by Zachi I Attia and colleagues1 describing the use of artificial intelligence (AI) using a convolutional neural net for identification of patients at risk of atrial fibrillation from electrocardiograms (ECGs) taken during sinus rhythm.

[Correspondence] An AI-ECG algorithm for atrial fibrillation risk: steps towards clinical implementation

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
Zachi I Attia and colleagues1 show us that we live in a time in which there is more to computer observations than meets the eye. Machine-learning methods for detecting imminent atrial fibrillation on electrocardiograms (ECGs) with sinus rhythm are a valuable step forwards, especially for patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source. However, some methodological drawbacks—related to the selection of controls—hamper implementation of their presented algorithm in clinical practice.

[Correspondence] An AI-ECG algorithm for atrial fibrillation risk: steps towards clinical implementation

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
The idea of being able to predict incident atrial fibrillation from just a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) with no demographic or clinical information in the Article by Zachi I Attia and colleagues1 raised much interest at the meeting of the AF-SCREEN International Collaboration.2

[Correspondence] An AI-ECG algorithm for atrial fibrillation risk: steps towards clinical implementation – Authors' reply

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
We thank our colleagues for their interest in our Article1 about artificial intelligence (AI)-enabled electrocardiogram (ECG) to identify patients with atrial fibriliation. They have posed key questions about confounding of the model by potential differences in baseline characteristics and about generalisability.

[Correspondence] Dismantling racism in research

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
The widespread dissemination of how George Floyd was murdered prompted people around the world to demand structural reform. We agree with the points raised in the Editorial about the need to “find ways to use science as an instrument for social change”.1 Here we highlight approaches for dismantling racism within research.

[Correspondence] Australia's First Nations' response to the COVID-19 pandemic

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
Kaitlin Curtice and Esther Choo1 described the well known risks for infectious diseases among First Nations internationally and the serious concerns that COVID-19 poses for them. These risks include their levels of chronic disease, poverty, poor living conditions, and racism in mainstream services with resulting lack of trust using them. They also highlighted the problem of data not being available specifically for First Nations so that authorities are blind to the situation and hence how best to help them.

[Correspondence] COVID-19 vaccine affordability and accessibility

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
The need to ensure the affordability of any future COVID-19 vaccine is gaining increasing attention.1 Although there is support for bulk purchasing, making vaccines affordable is fraught with difficulties, particularly for the so-called missing middle countries that are not eligible for aid from Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance or other aid but lack the resources to produce their own vaccines or afford patent-protected drugs.

[Department of Error] Department of Error

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
Local Burden of Disease Diarrhoea Collaborators. Mapping geographical inequalities in childhood diarrhoeal morbidity and mortality in low-income and middle-income countries, 2000–17: analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. Lancet 2020; 395: 1779–801—In this Article, Lorenzo Monasta was added to the author list as shown: “… Ali H Mokdad, Lorenzo Monasta, Yoshan Moodley, …”. The respective affiliation section has been amended. These changes have been made to the online version as of July 23, 2020.

[Articles] Emtricitabine and tenofovir alafenamide vs emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (DISCOVER): primary results from a randomised, double-blind, multicentre, active-controlled, phase 3, non-inferiority tr

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
Daily emtricitabine and tenofovir alafenamide shows non-inferior efficacy to daily emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for HIV prevention, and the number of adverse events for both regimens was low. Emtricitabine and tenofovir alafenamide had more favourable effects on bone mineral density and biomarkers of renal safety than emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate.

[Articles] Efficacy and safety of abrocitinib in adults and adolescents with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (JADE MONO-1): a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
Monotherapy with oral abrocitinib once daily was effective and well tolerated in adolescents and adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis.

[Articles] Continuing versus tapering glucocorticoids after achievement of low disease activity or remission in rheumatoid arthritis (SEMIRA): a double-blind, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
In patients who achieved low disease activity with tocilizumab and at least 24 weeks of glucocorticoid treatment, continuing glucocorticoids at 5 mg per day for 24 weeks provided safe and better disease control than tapering glucocorticoids, although two-thirds of patients were able to safely taper their glucocorticoid dose.

[Clinical Picture] Speechless from pain: migraine with prolonged aura

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
A 26-year-old man came to our emergency department accompanied by coworkers, who said their colleague was having difficulties with his speech. They explained that the factory employee had first complained to them about visual problems on his right side before he stopped talking altogether. They said the whole episode had started 1 h before.

[Review] The link between kidney disease and cancer: complications and treatment

The Lancet - Sa, 25/07/2020 - 00:00
Acute and chronic kidney disease encompasses a complex set of diseases that can both lead to, and result from, cancer. In particular, kidney disease can arise from the use of chemotherapeutic agents. Many of the current and newly developed cancer chemotherapeutic agents are nephrotoxic and can promote kidney dysfunction, which frequently manifests during the terminal stages of cancer. Given the link between kidney disease and cancer development and treatment, the aim of this Review is to highlight the importance of multidisciplinary collaboration between oncologists and nephrologists to predict and prevent chemotherapeutic-induced nephrotoxicity.
Condividi contenuti