Riviste scientifiche

Archaeologists are racing to find a lost city before it's ransacked

New Scientist - Gi, 17/10/2019 - 12:26
Ancient tablets from the lost city of Iri-Sagrig are being recovered from smugglers. Now archaeologists are racing to trace it before it is completely ransacked

Desert ant runs so fast it covers 100 times its body length per second

New Scientist - Gi, 17/10/2019 - 00:00
Saharan silver ants only have 10 minutes a day to find food in the searing desert heat, so they have evolved to run at almost a metre per second

A second mutation that makes people need less sleep has been found

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 20:00
A genetic mutation that lets people feel fully rested with less than six hours sleep has been identified, months after a similar discovery

Mother’s attention may shape baby’s hormone system and temperament

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 20:00
Babies who are touched, talked to and paid more attention by caregivers develop more receptors for the "cuddle chemical" oxytocin over their first 18 months

Deadly frog fungus now thrives where we thought it couldn’t survive

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 20:00
A notorious fungus that is devastating amphibian populations is far more common than first thought, leaving biologists wondering why only some infected animals die

Strange sand dunes on Titan could be made by cosmic rays hitting ice

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 20:00
Saturn’s largest moon Titan has strange sand dunes that seem to be full of organic molecules, which may form when radiation from space hits ice on the ground

Damping down brain cell activity may help us to live longer

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 19:00
Centenarians and other long-lived humans have higher levels of a protein in their brain that seems to reduce neural activity. The discovery could pave the way for longevity drugs

Humans evolved to think faster by slowing down brain development

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 19:00
Using stem cells to grow mini brains in a dish has let us compare the way brains develop in humans, chimpanzees and monkeys, and spot the differences

Why do Borderlands 3's treasure chests make me feel a dopamine rush?

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 19:00
The randomness of rewards in Borderlands 3's treasure chests blurs the boundaries between gaming and gambling for Jacob Aron. He asks where the line is and whether games are addictive

There is an answer to the world's deadliest human-elephant conflict

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 19:00
Sri Lanka has the world's highest rate of human-elephant conflict – last year alone, it killed 70 people and 300 elephants. A simple solution can make all the difference, if people are willing to try it

Stunning Tutankhamun show brings pharaoh's golden afterlife to London

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 19:00
From King Tutankhamun's golden slippers to a silver trumpet – plus 60 objects never seen outside Egypt – catch a global exhibition of the boy-king’s funerary objects

Hunting facts in the classic tale Moby-Dick makes for a strange voyage

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 19:00
New book Ahab's Rolling Sea highlights our destructiveness as it teases fact from fiction in Moby-Dick, the obsessive hunt for a great white whale

Inside Sri Lanka's deadly struggle to live peacefully with elephants

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 19:00
Sri Lanka has the world's highest rate of human-elephant conflict – last year alone, it killed 70 people and 300 elephants. A simple solution can make all the difference, if people are willing to try it

Technology’s future isn’t gleaming, it’s dirty and biological

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 19:00
We’ve always thought of tech as conquering nature, but the climate crisis is changing everything – not least what future advances will look like, argues Annalee Newitz

In the age of fake news and manipulation, you are the new battlefield

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 19:00
With states, political parties and individuals jockeying for ever-greater influence online, you and your clicks are now the front line in the information war

How to use the Orion constellation to find Sirius the dog star

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 19:00
Some of the sky's brightest stars including Rigel and Betelgeuse are located in the iconic constellation Orion. Here's how to find it and then star-hop to Sirius

UK scraps plan to enforce age checks on pornography websites

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 17:45
The UK government has dropped plans to introduce age verification measures designed to prevent children from accessing pornography online, which had sparked concerns about privacy

These evidence-based strategies may turn the tide on domestic violence

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 16:50
Deaths due to domestic violence have surged in the UK. Evidence suggests that a mixture of programmes to switch attitudes and help violent men change can help

A curved invisibility screen could hide soldiers or buildings

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 10:00
An invisibility screen that bends light can make objects look like they've disappeared. It could hide tanks or troops, or remove eyesores from a landscape

Worried about the future? The science behind coping with uncertainty

New Scientist - Me, 16/10/2019 - 07:00
Living with uncertainty can be unnerving and anxiety-inducing, whether it’s climate change, Brexit, exam results or simply waiting for a call. Fortunately there are ways to build resilience
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