Riviste scientifiche

Cannabis was burned for religious rituals in Biblical-era Israel

New Scientist - Ve, 29/05/2020 - 02:01
Residues of cannabis found on stone altars from a shrine in what was once the Biblical Kingdom of Judah suggest the plant was burned for its psychoactive effects

HIV-related outcome disparities between transgender women living with HIV and cisgender people living with HIV served by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program: A retrospective study

PLoS Medicine - Gi, 28/05/2020 - 23:00

by Pamela W. Klein, Demetrios Psihopaidas, Jessica Xavier, Stacy M. Cohen

Background

In the United States, approximately one-fifth of transgender women are living with HIV—nearly one-half of Black/African American (Black) transgender women are living with HIV. Limited data are available on HIV-related clinical indicators among transgender women. This is because of a lack of robust transgender data collection and research, especially within demographic subgroups. The objective of this study was to examine retention in care and viral suppression among transgender women accessing the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP)-supported HIV care, compared with cisgender women and cisgender men.

Methods and findings

We assessed the association between gender (cisgender or transgender) and (1) retention in care and (2) viral suppression using 2016 client-level RWHAP Services Report data. Multivariable modified Poisson regression models adjusting for confounding by age, race, health care coverage, housing, and poverty level, overall and stratified by race/ethnicity, were used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In 2016, the RWHAP served 6,534 transgender women (79.8% retained in care, 79.0% virally suppressed), 143,173 cisgender women (83.7% retained in care, 84.0% virally suppressed), and 382,591 cisgender men (81.0% retained in care, 85.9% virally suppressed). Black transgender women were less likely to be retained in care than Black cisgender women (aPR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92–0.97, p < 0.001). Black transgender women were also less likely to reach viral suppression than Black cisgender women (aPR: 0.55, 95%I CI: 0.41–0.73, p < 0.001) and Black cisgender men (aPR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.42–0.73, p < 0.001). A limitation of the study is that RWHAP data are collected for administrative, not research, purposes, and clinical outcome measures, including retention and viral suppression, are only reported to the RWHAP for the approximately 60% of RWHAP clients engaged in RWHAP-supported outpatient medical care.

Conclusions

In this study, we observed disparities in HIV clinical outcomes among Black transgender women. These results fill an important gap in national HIV data about transgender people with HIV. Reducing barriers to HIV medical care for transgender women is critical to decrease disparities among this population.

First map of tumour microbiomes finds bacteria live in many cancers

New Scientist - Gi, 28/05/2020 - 21:00
More than 500 strains of bacteria have been found living in seven types of tumour. Understanding their behaviour may lead to new kinds of treatments

Covid-19 news: One in seven people in the UK have had visitors at home

New Scientist - Gi, 28/05/2020 - 19:40
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

Covid-19 news: England test and trace system not 'fully operational'

New Scientist - Gi, 28/05/2020 - 19:40
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

Why it's better to fall into a big black hole, and other bizarre facts

New Scientist - Gi, 28/05/2020 - 17:39
Black holes exert a powerful pull on our imagination, but their weirdness starts way before you cross the event horizon, says astrophysicist Chris Impey

Chimps have local culture differences when it comes to eating termites

New Scientist - Gi, 28/05/2020 - 16:54
Different groups of chimpanzees have their own distinct ways of fishing for termites, suggesting these techniques are passed on as a form of local culture

People who compare themselves with others spend longer on Facebook

New Scientist - Gi, 28/05/2020 - 13:29
People who are prone to comparing themselves with others spend more time on Facebook, and the social network is considering changes that might remind people to avoid such comparisons

People who compare themselves to others spend longer on Facebook

New Scientist - Gi, 28/05/2020 - 13:29
People who are prone to comparing themselves to others spend more time on Facebook, and the social network is considering changes that might remind people to avoid such comparisons

Cannibal dinosaurs resorted to eating each other when food was scarce

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 21:00
Bite marks on a collection of Jurassic dinosaur bones show that allosaurus, a carnivorous dinosaur, sometimes ate its own kind, possibly because environmental conditions made other food scarce

Covid-19 news: Boris Johnson admits UK was unprepared for pandemic

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 20:00
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

Psychedelic skies over Chile reveal the full extent of light pollution

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 20:00
An image taken by astronomer Juan Carlos Munoz of the night sky above Santiago, Chile, uses optical techniques to reveal the extent of light pollution in major cities even while under lockdown

Coronavirus gives us a chance to transform our approach to the climate

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 20:00
Covid-19 has given us a glimpse of a world in which ways of life can be radically altered – it can be a turning point in our approach to the climate, if we choose to make it happen

No Signal review: Extreme track and trace pits liberty against society

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 20:00
When everything is recorded by an implant in the brain, people become paragons of moderation – but this societal bliss isn't all it's cracked up to be, finds Sally Adee

Climate chief: How coronavirus shows us we can beat global warming

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 20:00
Forget the naysayers: what we must do to combat climate change is far less drastic than coronavirus measures, says World Meteorological Organization head Petteri Taalas

How a victory for a small bog could herald a new era for conservation

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 20:00
Against the odds, a tiny wildlife retreat has won the day in a battle with developers. It is a sign that attitudes may finally be changing for the better, says Graham Lawton

The amazing Antarctic discovery that could tell us how Earth was made

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 20:00
Explorers trawling the polar ice have finally unearthed a trove of precious, iron-rich space rocks that might help crack the puzzle of how our planet took shape

We can see when your brain forms a memory by watching you move

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 19:44
Subtle patterns can be seen in people’s reaction times as their memories are recalled, and boosting these brainwaves could help treat Alzheimer’s disease

Ultrasonic speakers let people who are blind read Braille in mid-air

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 19:17
People who are blind can read using a device that uses ultrasonic speakers to create points in mid-air similar to the dots that form Braille characters

Strange radio signals reveal the matter hiding between galaxies

New Scientist - Me, 27/05/2020 - 18:00
One space mystery has helped solve another, with the discovery that strange space signals called fast radio bursts can help pin down the universe’s missing matter
Condividi contenuti