Riviste scientifiche

Quantum weirdness proved real in first loophole-free experiment

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
A century-long debate about whether quantum mechanics described reality or masked a deeper layer, as Einstein suggested, has concluded – quantum reality won









60 Seconds

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Sleep, don't sneeze, second time unlucky for psychology studies, the invisible threat of roads and more









Tetanus is no longer a threat to mothers and newborns in India

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Just over a year after eliminating polio, the country has declared that tetanus is no longer a public health threat, thanks to more hygienic birth practises









Europe to discuss deep-sea trawling ban to protect biodiversity

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
In the run-up to a debate on deep-sea fishing, new data suggests trawling should be banned below 600 metres to protect threatened species









NASA picks post-Pluto destination for New Horizons spacecraft

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Fresh off its July fly-by of Pluto, the New Horizons spacecraft is bound for a tiny object even further from the sun









65 per cent of Europe’s electronic waste is stolen or mismanaged

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
A two-year investigation into Europe's electronic waste found that most of it is stolen, mismanaged, illegally traded, or just thrown away.









Practising staring at small dots can shrink your blind spot

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Certain exercises can reduce the gaps in our visual field, and may eventually help those with eye damage to see better









Darwin’s fast-evolving finches use a natural insect repellent

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Four species of the iconic birds on the Galapagos Islands rub themselves with leaves that deter mosquitoes and parasitic flies









Zoologger: The tiny insects that roar at each other like lions

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Two types of mirid bug engage in roaring duels, possibly to establish dominance or attract females, but how they make the noise is unknown









Continental break-up set the stage for life in Earth’s mantle

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
The first evidence that ancient microbes colonised subsea mantle rock hints at how life might have emerged on Earth – and even other worlds









Live cells stuck together like Velcro could mend broken hearts

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Heart cells grown on a special mesh can be built up into living, beating tissue that could mend damage after heart attacks









Winking exoplanets could shed light on distant comet strikes

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
In 1994, comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 smacked into Jupiter – analysis of that impact could help us detect similar collisions in other solar systems









Birds circle and stick together to help them fly in dense fog

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
A rare observation of cranes flying in foggy conditions reveals that they circle cautiously and make noise to stay in touch with the rest of the flock









One Per Cent

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Google's pothole reporter, Facebook's milestone and its new assistant with AI









Vultures are new target for African bushmeat and medicine trade

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Africa's raptor birds, especially vultures, are experiencing drastic declines as more are being hunted for meat and use in traditional cures









Doctors use antipsychotics to calm ‘challenging behaviour’

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Psychotropic drugs such as antipsychotics are being prescribed to subdue people with intellectual disability who are not mentally ill









Knotty network could have powered universe’s early growth spurt

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
The theory behind why cables get tangled could explain both cosmic inflation and why we experience only three dimensions of space









Crowdsourcing lets the masses compose song one note at a time

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
A new site invites people to vote on which note should come next in a melody. Can a mob of strangers on the internet really write a good tune together?









Body-hack electrodes teach you by controlling your muscles

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
A gentle jolt of electricity could nudge your muscles into learning a new skill or add an extra dimension to virtual reality. Hal Hodson got hooked up









Fatter than your siblings? It could be because you’re older

New Scientist - Me, 02/09/2015 - 19:00
Firstborn women are more likely to be overweight then their little sisters. A result of their parents doting on them, or their mother's inexperienced womb?









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