Riviste scientifiche

Albatrosses strapped with sensors help spy on illegal fishing boats

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 21:00
Attach a radar sensor to an albatross and you have a bird spy. Researchers deployed 169 of them in the Indian Ocean and found that a quarter of fishing vessels may be operating illegally

Albatrosses strapped with sensors help spy on illegal fishing boats

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 21:00
Attach a radar sensor to an albatross and you have a bird spy. Researchers deployed 169 of them in the Indian Ocean and found that a quarter of fishing vessels may be operating illegally

Harsh peer reviewer comments disproportionately affect minorities

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 18:24
A survey has found that women and ethnic minority researchers are more likely to experience self-doubt in response to unprofessional comments from peer reviewers

Harsh peer reviewer comments disproportionately affect minorities

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 18:24
A survey has found that women and ethnic minority researchers are more likely to experience self-doubt in response to unprofessional comments from peer reviewers

Can an N95 face mask protect you from catching the new coronavirus?

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 16:56
Face masks are reportedly selling out across China, as people try to protect themselves from the new coronavirus. But in some cases, it may be dangerous to wear certain masks

Can an N95 face mask protect you from catching the new coronavirus?

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 16:56
Face masks are reportedly selling out across China, as people try to protect themselves from the new coronavirus. But in some cases, it may be dangerous to wear certain masks

New coronavirus may be much more contagious than initially thought

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 13:42
The new coronavirus is spreading faster than SARS - and it may be because it can be passed on before a person shows any sign of symptoms

New coronavirus may be much more contagious than initially thought

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 13:42
The new coronavirus is spreading faster than SARS - and it may be because it can be passed on before a person shows any sign of symptoms

A skull suggests humans have been getting piercings for 12,000 years

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 13:38
The teeth of a man who lived in prehistoric Africa are worn in a way that suggests he had three facial piercings, the second oldest such find in the world

A skull suggests humans have been getting piercings for 12,000 years

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 13:38
The teeth of a man who lived in prehistoric Africa are worn in a way that suggests he had three facial piercings, the second oldest such find in the world

NHS may use people's phone data to predict mental health issues

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 12:02
A National Health Service trust has partnered with telecoms firm Telefonica to trial an algorithm that can identify people at risk of mental health crisis. A next step could see mobile phone data being used to make predictions

NHS may use people's phone data to predict mental health issues

New Scientist - Lu, 27/01/2020 - 12:02
A National Health Service trust has partnered with telecoms firm Telefonica to trial an algorithm that can identify people at risk of mental health crisis. A next step could see mobile phone data being used to make predictions

Wild horses in the US are being shot with contraceptive darts

New Scientist - Do, 26/01/2020 - 08:00
Wild horse populations in the western US are growing out of control, but contraceptive darts may be an effective way to stop them breeding

Dinosaur tracks seem to show giant sauropods wading on two front legs

New Scientist - Sa, 25/01/2020 - 08:00
Sauropod dinosaurs grew to 25 metres or more in length and weighed several tonnes – but footprints in Texas seem to suggest they sometimes walked on just two legs

Dinosaur tracks seem to show giant sauropods wading on two front legs

New Scientist - Sa, 25/01/2020 - 08:00
Sauropod dinosaurs grew to 25 metres or more in length and weighed several tonnes – but footprints in Texas seem to suggest they sometimes walked on just two legs

Dinosaur tracks seem to show giant sauropod wading on two front legs

New Scientist - Sa, 25/01/2020 - 08:00
Sauropod dinosaurs grew to 25 metres or more in length and weighed several tonnes – but footprints in Texas seem to suggest they sometimes walked on just two legs

[Editorial] The antimicrobial crisis: enough advocacy, more action

The Lancet - Sa, 25/01/2020 - 00:00
Global advocacy has been successful in mobilising attention to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) by governments and agencies worldwide. Indeed, in the past decade, there has been a steady flow of reports, action plans, declarations, initiatives, and resolutions on what should be done. Inadequate access to antimicrobials and AMR are formidable threats to both human and animal health. The World Economic Forum's annual meeting in Davos (Jan 21–25) will raise the profile of AMR again, but has this global advocacy translated into global action? In a word, no.

[Editorial] Doctors and civil disobedience

The Lancet - Sa, 25/01/2020 - 00:00
Civil disobedience—a public, non-violent action in breach of the law aimed at changing the law or policies of a government—is not a typical tool of the medical trade. But frustration with inaction on the global climate emergency has galvanised doctors and other health professionals to join public protests, some of which have involved breaking the law, thus incurring considerable personal and professional risk. Robin Stott, in an Essay this week, describes his experience of arrest during an Extinction Rebellion protest in London, highlighting how a duty of care can compel one to act disobediently in the clear interest of public health.

[Editorial] Ending childhood violence in Europe

The Lancet - Sa, 25/01/2020 - 00:00
Last week, the WHO European Region held a meeting of stakeholders to help enact national programmes to prevent violence against children. WHO estimates that in Europe alone, one in three children (55 million) encounter some form of physical, sexual, emotional, or psychological violence each year. Given that these figures likely underestimate the real scale of the problem, the WHO European Region has reaffirmed its commitment to making the issue more visible and supporting countries in developing and implementing evidence-based and data-driven national action plans.

[Comment] Simple and safe: preventing preterm birth with aspirin

The Lancet - Sa, 25/01/2020 - 00:00
Preterm birth is one of the most common causes of death and disability in children in high-income and low-income countries around the world.1 Wealthy nations have targeted the problem with expensive interventions, including ultrasounds of the cervical length at mid-trimester, multidisciplinary specialist hospital clinics, and expensive pharmaceuticals. However, many cases of preterm birth can be better addressed using a public health approach.2–7
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